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Why 4K instead of 2160p?

Started by DJ Omnimaga, November 18, 2015, 04:31:25 am

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Streetwalrus

Not really, nowadays they make cameras far beyond 20MP, I forgot how much but it's huge.
Also note that resolution isn't everything, it's just the amount of detail you can display or capture. There are many other factors affecting quality.

DJ Omnimaga

I know, I omce tried taking a picture with an iPod Touch and the quality, despite the image being high resolution, looked like someone applied a painting filter on the picture. I couldn't even read any text in it. X.x

rwill

Last post Nov 28, but I see the need to reply anyway...

For television/broadcast there is 720p ( sometimes called HD Ready ) and 1080p/i ( HD ) and 2160p ( UHD ).

For cinema there is mostly 2k and 4k with _various_ vertical resolutions and sometimes adjusted horizontal resolution.

I will not comment on the use of the term "4k" when used for consumer devices but I suggest to read the wikipedia entry for the 4k resolution. The german wikipedia entry for 2k https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/2K_(Film) has an interesting resolution table for digital cinema as well.

PS: My password was rejected ~3 times when logging in to CW, then it worked. I did not make a mistake typing because I used copy/paste.

ben_g

I think that actually 720P is HD instead of 'HD Ready', 1080p is "Full HD" and 2160p is "Ultra HD" (though more commonly called '4k', even though 'Ultra HD' sounds cooler).

DJ Omnimaga

December 30, 2015, 06:15:02 am #19 Last Edit: December 30, 2015, 06:17:35 am by DJ Omnimaga
Quote from: rwill on December 21, 2015, 06:45:42 pm
Last post Nov 28, but I see the need to reply anyway...

For television/broadcast there is 720p ( sometimes called HD Ready ) and 1080p/i ( HD ) and 2160p ( UHD ).

For cinema there is mostly 2k and 4k with _various_ vertical resolutions and sometimes adjusted horizontal resolution.

I will not comment on the use of the term "4k" when used for consumer devices but I suggest to read the wikipedia entry for the 4k resolution. The german wikipedia entry for 2k https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/2K_(Film) has an interesting resolution table for digital cinema as well.

PS: My password was rejected ~3 times when logging in to CW, then it worked. I did not make a mistake typing because I used copy/paste.

I remember back when 720p TVs came out, they were advertising them as HD TVs here, while 1080p TVs were advertised as the same or as full HD. We really had to be careful when checking stores since we were often misinformed. Then there was Staples, who advertised the TI-89 Titanium as a TI-89 made of titanium.


As for the password, copy/paste doesn't work with passwords on most forums, because it pastes something different (sometimes much longer too). I think it was done to discourage people from copy/pasting when asked to enter their password twice in sign-up forms, due to the risk of mistyping it then copying the error in the second field. I could be wrong, though.

semiprocoder

Well, advertising HD as 720p is technically correct according to wiki and my old camera. Then 1080p is full HD.
Also, Staples advertised ti 89 titanium's as actually made of titanium? Was it like for the features or something, because otherwise that seems like misinformation.
My cemetech username is awesommee333.

DJ Omnimaga

Yeah, that Staples calculator page is so bad that it's good. I think they used an automatic translator program or the one who translated it did it literally, resulting into the fail that they now had for three years.

DarkestEx

Quote from: Cumred_Snektron on November 27, 2015, 03:43:36 pm
My calculator has a 6K monitor: 96 * 64 = 6144 pixels

I have a camera that has 0.0009 MP and can operate at 6400 frames / sec. I'll be using it in my CNC mill for basic object finding.

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