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Another shocking government trick to spy on us (Printers involved)

Started by DarkestEx, April 28, 2015, 11:04:49 pm

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berenicenel

The British government is the one that collects all the intrusive data. It just let's the NSA have full access. And all them drones that watch and kill- all ported at America's airbase in Germany with full concent from German government. It's not America so much as NATO that's the problem.

DJ Omnimaga

I thought that the main problem with the British government was censoring many websites, China-style, or at least warez sites and the like? Or did that end up being scrapped?

Quote from: Streetwalrus on May 22, 2015, 09:11:50 am
Quote from: DJ Omnimaga on May 20, 2015, 09:41:28 pm
Something I wonder is if starting a new underground internet protocol as alternative to HTTP that cannot be accessed by government would be feasible? That idea was brought up before. My worry, though, is that it could end up in the wrong hands, for example used by terrorists, then intervention from authorities would be required before it gets out of control.

It's called https. But knowing them they probably have a s***load of backdoors in ssl. :P
Yeah I meant something else for that specific reason.

Snektron

That's probably going to have a lot of backdoors too.
btw the closest thing to security programming i've done is made a mod to chat via ssl in minecraft. The messages get encrypted and a few keys get send via text, after that you can chat like normal but everyone else just sees "random" text
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DJ Omnimaga

Yeah my worry is that by the time a new secure protocol becomes a thing, the government will send spies into the unsuspecting development team to report how it's done and how it could be circumvented. Same for terrorist groups. The only thing we can do is protest, but most of the time governments are either not listening or they're mismanaged so much that they would take years to do anything.

And if people manage to get a bill blocked or to make the government stop spying, they just find another way to sneak in.

Snektron

The trick is to make something where you can see the inner workings, but you still can't break it. Like the asymmetric encryption used in ssl
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DJ Omnimaga

This isn't related to printers, but rather iPhones. There are rumors that Apple was ordered or asked to open a backdoor in their devices to allow the FBI to spy on people to find terrorists. This is Apple's response (for now): http://www.apple.com/customer-letter/

alexgt

Wow O.o good thing I use android ;)

Though the gov will probably force them too <_<

Dudeman313

They were asked to do this by the FBI. It appeared on BBC yesterday; there was a terrorist attack and the 2 culprits were killed, but the man's iPhone was recovered. The FBI has been at it for 2 months; they can't break into it.
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Juju

Yeah, saw that too, in short Apple is concerned that if the gov't have a backdoor to break open that phone, security would be compromised.

Also saw John McAfee, as the badass guy he is, claims he can break the encryption open in 3 weeks.
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Dudeman313

Apple is scared of being sliced- the backdoor software they might have to make could be easily adapted and used for almost all of iOS, which is probably not a good thing. Also, if it was known that it was possible to break into their tech, their sales in the iPhone market might decrease even more, despite their attempts to fix their "Bigger is Better" phase by releasing a future smaller model.
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DJ Omnimaga

The issue is if Apple tells them how to break into that particular iPhone, then the FBI will know how to do it with other people's phones and then it can escalate into a full-scale surveillance.

Also from what I heard in the news, yes Apple was ordered to do it and the letter they posted is not a final decision: Basically they refused for now, but there is still no guarantees that they will win against the FBI.


Also if they're doing it with the iPhone they're also gonna do it with Windows phones and Android devices.

aeTIos

Quote from: DJ Omnimaga on February 19, 2016, 06:35:50 am
The issue is if Apple tells them how to break into that particular iPhone, then the FBI will know how to do it with other people's phones and then it can escalate into a full-scale surveillance.

Also from what I heard in the news, yes Apple was ordered to do it and the letter they posted is not a final decision: Basically they refused for now, but there is still no guarantees that they will win against the FBI.


Also if they're doing it with the iPhone they're also gonna do it with Windows phones and Android devices.

They can't do it on Android devices, because Android is open-source. A backdoor would immediately stand out, and be removed by the community (at least in 3rd party Android versions like Cyanogenmod)
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Lionel Debroux

Backdoors - or at least, involuntary bugs which can be abused as such - can be surprisingly easy to introduce, and pretty persistent. Witness e.g. Heartbleed, whose author wasn't even trying to be underhanded.
Various Android phones have had their share of silly holes, e.g. a protection-less version of /dev/mem used for debugging and left in production for some Samsung phones. The iP* had its share of blunders too, though none stands on my mind.

Proper FLOSS is consistently proving to be the best protection against bad code: Coverity and their competitors repeatedly state that on average, FLOSS programs have significantly fewer defects than proprietary programs. However, it's far from being foolproof...
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aeTIos

I didn't say you can't introduce a security hole in android, I did however say that it's not possible to demand a backdoor be put in there.
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DJ Omnimaga

Could the government modify the constitution to make encryption and patching such security exploits illegal and send anyone who gets caught trying to hide their data from the NSA to jail?

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