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Audio cassettes still alive

Started by DJ Omnimaga, July 28, 2016, 10:26:48 pm

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c4ooo

So why are analog mediums higher quality anyway? Greater resolution/volume levels?

WholeWheatBagels

Maybe something to do with compression?
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c4ooo

There are uncompressed audio files like .wav. Also the first CD's that came out were *not* digital. They stored more info though becouse the width of red light (the laser) was smaller then that of a metal arm that vinals used :P Despite this, people still say that these analog CDs had poorer quality.

WholeWheatBagels

Weird. Maybe its just a placebo. My ears aren't good enough to tell the difference anyways.

"Analog CD" sounds like a contradiction :P
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Also in case you were wondering Frankie did go to Hollywood

Juju

October 04, 2016, 12:30:04 am #19 Last Edit: October 04, 2016, 12:38:37 am by Juju
Not that much. Think of the grooves of a vinyl, only way smaller and readable with a laser instead of a needle. I don't know what Analog CD is I'm pretty sure it might be this.

Edit: The difference between analog and digital, think of analog as one continuous line on a graphic. When you digitalize, for storing on a computer for instance, you store the values on the y axis every set interval on the x axis (also known as sampling), which would indeed lose some quality as you would interpolate the values between the intervals and the resolution on the y axis is larger. For small enough intervals, the difference is negligible.
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WholeWheatBagels

Makes sense. I just always thought that CDs were full digital. Now that you say that it makes sense though.
Living in another world to you.



Also in case you were wondering Frankie did go to Hollywood

c4ooo

We should start making digital vinal readers. Image how many of those it would take to store windows :ninja:

Travis

Wikipedia hints that there was some experimentation done for an audio format read by laser, but it wasn't considered good enough and never saw the light of day. So, they developed a digital format that became CD. I don't know of any analog format on the market that was ever called "Compact Disc"; the CD we know was always a digital format. It's possible in principle, though. LaserDisc, for instance, is read optically by the same sort of laser as CD, but it stores analog video and can have either digital or analog audio. (The discs were huge at 12 in./30 cm across because analog video required a lot of space, even with the microscopic optical grooves. Oh, and even then, movies came on several discs, and you had to flip over or change them a few times during the showing. :D)

Quote from: DJ Omnimaga on October 03, 2016, 08:36:24 pm
@Travis to be fair I am not a big fan of computers or machines processing all the keys I inputted after it's no longer busy, unless there is a way to abort the key input string. Otherwise this can lead to accidents. On the other hand, missed keypresses would be very annoying (see the TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition and TI-84 Plus CE on-calc editors). >.<


You bring up a good point, actually. There are times where I type ahead and actually change my mind, and I haven't seen a single program or system to date that has a "panic button" that lets me immediately clear the pending key buffer without interrupting anything else. I feel there ought to be one.

QuoteOn a side note I wonder which VCR's used to play the sound while fast-forwarding?


I haven't seen many. But it seems like I remember one I saw in elementary school (in the late '80s or early '90s) that did that.

Also, I actually had one of my VCRs do that, exactly one time. Normally, the sound is muted during fast motion, but on one occasion a weird glitch occurred and it left the sound on in fast-forward. It happened just one time, and then never again.

(On a side note, some VCRs, I think (and DVD players, too) had a "fast playback" that could play the audio and correct the pitch so that it still sounds normal. This is usually limited to double-speed or slower, though, and I don't know of that being done for a full-speed fast-forward/rewind.)

Juju

October 04, 2016, 03:03:00 am #23 Last Edit: October 04, 2016, 03:15:05 am by Juju
Quote from: c4ooo on October 04, 2016, 01:50:14 am
We should start making digital vinal readers. Image how many of those it would take to store windows :ninja:
Someone ought to experiment with that.

Theorically, it should be possible with systems using digital tape readers, such as the Commodore 64. If you manage to record a program on a vinyl with some sort of vinyl recorder, then plug your turntable on a Commodore 64, it should work.


(EDIT: Clint from Lazy Game Reviews actually mentions it at 8:52, it actually existed, some games were actually distributed in vinyl format in Europe)
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WholeWheatBagels

Quote from: Juju on October 04, 2016, 03:03:00 am
... some games were actually distributed in vinyl format in Europe


so you know how they've started selling game soundtracks? put that on one side of as 12", game on the other and boom
the next big moneymaker
Living in another world to you.



Also in case you were wondering Frankie did go to Hollywood

c4ooo

Hmm @Travis I guess ime confusing some stuff about analog CDs >_>

DJ Omnimaga

What I heard often is that while CD uses wav files, they're still compressed due to being a maximum amount of KHz sampling, which could explain the quality differences with vinyl. On the other hand, part of the blame about CD's is loudness war. Many CD's are recorded as loud as possible and this result into quieter parts becoming louder or the louder parts bei g clipped.

aeTIos

No, CDs are not compressed, they use uncompressed dual channel PCM audio at 44100Hz sample rate. It's just not a continuous signal because well, it's digital.
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Travis

One reason some people like vinyl better may be because of the sound characteristics of older analog technology vs. modern DACs (differences in frequency response, distortion, etc.). Even if the modern digital sound technology might technically be more accurate, some seem to like the way older tech sounded. (This seems to apply especially to tube vs. transistor amps.) There may also be psychological effects, where if someone prefers one or the other and knows which type is playing (or thinks they do), they might hear one as sounding better or worse even if it's exactly the same. The latter is where double-blind ABX tests and such come in.

c4ooo

As the wikipedia page points out, even if you get a recording in audio format it is likely been digital in some point of its life.

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