Recent Posts

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Randomness / Re: Walrii storytelling!
« Last post by _iPhoenix_ on Yesterday at 06:56:14 pm »
...3 to 5 pseudorandomly distrubuted walrus-particles each exactly 1/3 the size of the original walrus, which in turn exploded into a sea of hundreds of adorable 3 inch (about 8 cm) tall baby walruses...
Code: [Select]
kk we legit need a plot cuz this ain't goin anywhere...who each stared at the explorers expectantly. They were interested in the shiny device being held by the first explorer. The swarm of walruses took a nervous step towards him, unsure what exactly to do. Subconciously, the inexperienced walruses decided that the best route to the device was to climb up the explorer's leg. Gravity kicked in, and plan 'a' failed. Time for plan 'b', which involved...
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Randomness / Re: Walrii storytelling!
« Last post by Juju on Yesterday at 06:46:37 pm »
...and exploded into...
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Phones & Tablets / Block Ninja
« Last post by _iPhoenix_ on Yesterday at 06:33:20 pm »
Block Ninja is a less-than-fully featured Fruit Ninja clone written for iPhone/iPad using the app Pythonista 3. (The app costs 10USD, but I assure you it is worth every penny of that. It is easily the best Python app in the app store with loads of features you will use and loads of features you didn't know you'd use. I'd actually rather program in it than in the default python Mac install).
It has a lot of awesome features and because of built-in sprites and a decent amount of math it looks quite good!


Eye candy:


Download the latest version of BlockNinja.py from this here and Pythonista 3 from the App Store (if you don't already have it). Load the BlockNinja.py file into Pythonista, and you're all set to play!


It features a high scores table, streaks, bombs, crits, a timer, advanced particle effects, and lots of obscure hacks and shims in the code because it wouldn't be a game written by me without them.


I feel obligated to put this in here, because I am promoting something that does cost real money. I'm not affiliated with Pythonista or its creators in any way (I'm not getting paid or anything for promoting the app), I got the app myself, toyed around with it and think the app is awesome, so you should totally get it, too.

New in v1.1:
- The timer flashes red when you are running out of time
- Loads of helpful and funny (if I do say so myself), in-code documentation.
- Optimizations
- Blocks hit with crits have particles that travel farther.
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Randomness / Re: Walrii storytelling!
« Last post by _iPhoenix_ on Yesterday at 10:02:16 am »
Code: [Select]
bump...canal lock...
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Calc Projects, Programming & Tutorials / Re: Prime Linux
« Last post by shak0579 on June 17, 2018, 11:08:10 pm »
(click to show/hide)
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Tech, Science, IT discussion & News / Re: OEIS golfing!
« Last post by _iPhoenix_ on June 17, 2018, 01:11:38 am »
Python 3, A005131, 53 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=lambda n:[2*~-i//3if 1==i%3else 1for i in range(n)]Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call with f(n), with n being your input.

(We don't need to stick to JS :) )
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Tech, Science, IT discussion & News / Re: OEIS golfing!
« Last post by Juju on June 16, 2018, 11:01:52 pm »
JavaScript, A000007, 30 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=x=>[1,...Array(x-1).fill(0)]Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.

JavaScript, A076337, 8 bytes
Code: [Select]
[509203]Returns the entire sequence with terms proven so far. (This one's kinda stupid, but yeah. It only have one term so far.)

JavaScript, A000079, 37 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=x=>Array.from(Array(x),(a,i)=>2**i)Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.
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Tech, Science, IT discussion & News / Re: OEIS golfing!
« Last post by _iPhoenix_ on June 16, 2018, 09:18:12 pm »
JavaScript, A174375, 59 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=n=>{for(i=0,q=[];i<n;i++) q.push((j=i*i)-(j^i));return q}Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.

This one is pretty cool, despite its apparent simplicity. If you graph f(n) against n, it approximates a Sierpinski gasket when the maximum n is a power of two.
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Tech, Science, IT discussion & News / Re: OEIS golfing!
« Last post by Juju on June 16, 2018, 08:18:55 pm »
Sounds fun. Let's golf every sequence!

JavaScript, A005132, 80 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=x=>{for(q=[0],s=i=0;i<x;)q[++i]=s+=i*(s-i<=0||!!~q.indexOf(s-i))*2-i;return q}Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.

SVG, A005132, 271 267 bytes
Code: [Select]
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"><path id="p" stroke="#000" fill="none"/><script>/*<![CDATA[*/q=[];a="M2,325";for(s=i=0;i<65;)c=s-++i<=0||!!~q.indexOf(s-i),q[i]=s+=j=i*c*2-i,a+=`a1,1 0 0,${i%2^c} ${j}0,0`;document.all[1].setAttribute("d",a)//]]></script></svg>Interesting graphic of the above sequence (first 65 steps)

JavaScript (ES6), A001477, 25 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=x=>[...Array(x).keys()]Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.
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Tech, Science, IT discussion & News / OEIS golfing!
« Last post by _iPhoenix_ on June 16, 2018, 07:00:48 pm »
Inspired by this, and highly inspired by the Programming Puzzles and Code Golf (PPCG) stack exchange. If there are any doubts with the rules, default to their rules.


You must take a sequence in the OEIS (it must be known that it has infinite terms), and write a program taking a input, n, (somehow. If your language doesn't support taking input, editing the source code to insert a decimal number is allowed) and outputting, in base 10 plain text the first n terms of that sequence. You must start at the first term in the sequence. This can be via a file, a function return, etc


No hard-coding solutions, you should use an algorithm.
No reading from external sources.
No asking for the sequence from the user.
The program should be your own work. No stealing programs from other users.
(Use good judgement)
Programming languages are defined by their implementation, so the programming language must have a working compiler/interpreter by the time of this post.
Feel free to help others with their code golf. Be sure to explain what you changed and why it works!

If you are showing off your code golf, format your post like this:
(click to show/hide)


I'll go first.


JavaScript, A025480, 70 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=r=>{for(s=[],i=0;i<r;i++)s[2*i]=i,s[2*i+1]=s[i];return s.length=r,s}Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.


inb4
JavaScript, A000012, 21 bytes
Code: [Select]
f=r=>Array(r).fill(1)Defines a function, f, that returns an array of integers. Call it from the console with f(n), with n being your input.
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